An interview with Henryk Miśkiewicz: I’ll play forever and people will want to listen to my music, which doesn’t get old … Video

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Jazz interview with Jazz Alto Saxophonist Henryk Miśkiewicz. An interview by Facebook in writing.

JazzBluesNews.Space: – First let’s start with where you grew up, arid what got you interested in music?

Henryk Miśkiewicz: – I grew up in a little town, Kożuchów. The interest in music has always been in my home, because my father was a musician.

JBN.S: – What interested you in picking up the saxophone?

HM: – Saxophone came later. There just was one in the house.

JBN.S: – What teacher or teachers helped you progress to the saxophonist you are today? What made you choose the alto saxophon?

HM: – My father played alto sax. Besides, when I heard Cannonball Adderley and Charlie Parker I was positive I had chosen the right instrument. I didn’t have a sax teacher. I studied clarinet at high school.

JBN.S: – What about the Your sound did that influence at all? What did you do to find and develop your sound?

HM: – I think it’s very important to practice playing long notes  in dynamics from piano pianissimo to forte fortissimo, there and back, through the whole scale of the instrument. I still practice that. My sound is the effect of the influence of sax players I listened to. But the sound is also something you bear inside you, so it is not only created by what you listen to but also what you would like it to sound.

JBN.S: – What practice routine or exercise have you developed to maintain and improve your current musical ability especially pertaining to rhythm?

HM: – I had a wonderful teacher at school who paid a lot of attention to rhythm, which isn’t so common with classical music teachers. So I focused on rhythm from the early age. I also used to write down the improvisations of Parker, Adderley and others. In the 70’s there were no sheets with jazz music in Poland. So the only base we had were the recordings we shared with friends.

JBN.S: – Many aspiring musicians are always looking for advice when navigating thru the music business. Is there any piece of advice you can offer to aspiring students or even your peers that you believe will help them succeed and stay positive in this business?

HM: – My advice is focusing on musical integrity, authenticity and hard work; learning about the roots of jazz and developing your talent on these basis.

JBN.S: – What are your hopes and fears for the future of?

HM: – I don’t have fears. I hope I’ll play forever and people will want to listen to my music, which doesn’t get old.

JBN.S: – Are there any similarities between the blues/jazz and the genres of local folk music and traditional forms?

HM: – There is a sililarity between jazz and blues mainly in feeling. But folk music is different in every country, so it’s hard to generalize. I remember when I heard a couple of old Polish folk musicians, who played with incredible feeling, their rhythm captivated me. It wasn’t jazzy, but swingy in a way.

JBN.S: – Who do you find yourself listening to these days?

HM: – I listen to different music. There isn’t one artist who rules in my house. There were before but now I have room for all.

Interview by Simon Sargsyan

Фото Henryk Miśkiewicz.

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