Interview with Paolo Fresu: Music is poetry, emotion, mysticism, mystery, communication … Video

- in INTERVIEWS, VIDEOS

Jazz interview with jazz trumpeter and flugelhornist Paolo Fresu. An interview by email in writing. 

JazzBluesNews.Space: – First let’s start with where you grew up, and what got you interested in music?

Paolo Fresu: – I loved music from an early age and strummed the harmonica and then the guitar. In my native country (Berchidda in the north of Sardinia) there was (and still is) an ancient band that I saw passing through the street. My dream was to be part of it until, at the age of ten, I did not enroll in the Band School to learn the instrument and read music.

JBN.S: – What got you interested in picking up the your musical instrument? What teacher or teachers helped you progress to the level of playing you have today? What made you choose the your musical instrument?

PF: – I had the trumpet in the house because my brother, before me, was also enrolled in the course of the band but then he had left. Let’s say that it was the tool that chose me! Soon after, I started playing with dance groups to cheer marriages and then in the complexes for patronal feasts and dance evenings until I discovered jazz in the late seventies and fell in love with it. So, my first Master was that of the Banda, Tiu Bustianu Piga. I studied jazz instead as a self-taught person even though I went to Siena Jazz for two years to take lessons with the saxophonist Claudio Fasoli and then with Enrico Rava. I also graduated from the Conservatory of Cagliari but I have never embarked on a classical career.

JBN.S: – How did your sound evolve over time? What did you do to find and develop your sound?

PF: – I did not have a good sound. I developed the sound at the Conservatory but, at the same time, I spent a lot of time listening to my favorite trumpet players who were Miles Davis and Chet Baker although I also heard the others from the Bop and also Booker Little. We know that I spent a lot of time listening to Davis’ version of ‘Round Midnight’ from the 1956 Columbia homonymous disc. I loved his mute sound very much …

JBN.S: – What practice routine or exercise have you developed to maintain and improve your current musical ability especially pertaining to rhythm?

PF: – It depends on the time available. If I’m traveling I cannot study and I do so at home. But I do not work on patterns or things related to time but rather on the technique of the instrument. Many of the other things I think can be studied without the instrument because I start from the idea that you should play what you think. Only if I cannot sing (or whistle) something I feel the need to practice it with the instrument … Also, it takes time to write music, arrange, think …

JBN.S: – Which harmonies and harmonic patterns do you prefer now?

PF: – Possibly I try to avoid the patterns even if they are necessary to leave and to learn. And I also try not to think about harmonies but to work on horizontality and therefore on melody. I really like the melody and the diatonic development of music and more and more I try to dig in this direction. So, I do not memorize the structure of the chords but I try to memorize the sound and the sequence. If I had to write the harmony of one of my pieces, I would have to look for it …. For this reason, I always strive to learn everything by heart and to do without the score to feel more free.

Image result for paolo fresu “50 anni suonati”

JBN.S: – What do you love most about your new album 2017: <50 – fifty years played>, how it was formed and what you are working on today. This year your fans like we can wait for a new album?

PF: – “50 years played” is actually an anthology with 50 live tracks chosen from the 50 concerts given in 2011. It is connected to a DVD made by the young French director Marthe le More which is the story. In 2017, I published the other live in duo with Uri Caine entitled “Two Minuettos” and this is also the summary of a ‘white paper’ of three concerts (with three different themes) made at the Teatro dell’Elfo in Milan three Years ago. Instead, in early 2018 “Carpe Diem” will be released, the acoustic version of the electric group Devil Quartet.

JBN.S: – Which are the best jazz albums for you this 2017 year?

PF: – I have new idea. There are too many good things I’ve heard and music is not a race where you have to get there first. I could pull random and make such a good impression by answering your question or choose the record of a friend or my record label but it would not be honest on my part.

JBN.S: – Please any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

PF: – The first recording in a real studio and the crazy fear of being able to hear my real sound on the other side of the glass … IU tour of the “50 ‘years played” that I did in Sardinia in 2011 to celebrate my fiftieth birthday with 50 concerts in 50 consecutive days with 50 different projects all in beautiful and original outdoor locations … A concert in a hospital for children and one in prison … One on a tree and another on an airplane … Let’s say that every day there is one thing to remember and if you have been playing professionally for almost thirty-five years with almost two hundred concerts a year, there are many things to remember. Even those a little unflattering that I try to forget …

JBN.S: – Many aspiring musicians are always looking for advice when navigating thru the music business. Is there any piece of advice you can offer to aspiring students or even your peers that you believe will help them succeed and stay positive in this business?

PF: – Business is important because music is our life and we have to live on this. But first there is the passion that moves everything and therefore, before thinking of the business, we must think about growing and doing things well. There is a time for everything even if we need to be aware of the need to protect our rights and also to know our duties. I believe the truth lies in the balance between producing good music and trying to sell it in the best way. Furthermore, we must be very conscious, in a world that is not yet connected and equitable despite the Internet, of the fact that being a musician means having professional rights and also linked to the record industry. We must therefore be informed and demand their rights.

JBN.S: – Аnd furthermore, can jazz be a business today or someday?

PF: – Yes. Why should not it be?

JBN.S: – Which collaboration have been the most important experiences for you?

PF: – Every experience is and has been important. Certainly, the very first with the bass player and arranger Bruno Tommaso who gave me confidence. After this the creation of the first group in my name with the musicians of my historical Quintet and then all the others. From my groups to small chamber formations and duo. I could make names but, again this time, it would be unjust to those not mentioned and the important collaborations, not only in the field of jazz but music in general and artistic languages, are many.

JBN.S: – How can we get young people interested in jazz when most of the standard tunes are half a century old?

PF: – Today’s Jazz…so, not only the standards but these, to be good jazz musicians, you anyway have to know them. Being ‘jazz’ today, means being able to touch any material and do it right. The problem of the little interest of young people with belief is in the material and in the repertoire but rather in the way in which this is proposed. The modalities are as important as the places. In fact, many have no idea what jazz is and maybe they’ve never heard it. If this happens it is our fault. Of the little courage and lack of inventiveness of some programmers as well as a certain discomfort due to the places where the music is consumed that should be within reach of everything and that should put the listener, regardless of age, at ease. Then there is the problem of discography and digital music that is changing the concept of music fruition but it is too complex a subject to be addressed here.

JBN.S: – John Coltrane said that music was his spirit. How do you understand the spirit and the meaning of life?

PF: – Not only music is our ‘spirit’ but it is also our ‘mystic’. If we can make music the center of our discoveries and our aspirations, it will be placed in a high place. Although music is not everything, it is part of our life and only when it is not there do we realize how important it is for us and for the society we live in. Music is poetry, emotion, mysticism, mystery, communication. The list is so long that everyone can add what they want but, above all, we are music and it grows and develops with us and thanks to us. Is not this all extraordinary?

JBN.S: – What are your expectations of the future? What brings you fear or anxiety?

PF: – No anxiety about the future. First because I am not an anxious person and then because the future – I mean the seemingly foreseeable – depends on us and on how we set it. The rest is difficult to know, but if we have worked well, the future will be good if not tormented by the disease and the harmful causes. An Italian saying says that “who sows wind collects storm”. This presupposes that those who sow well have a rich harvest. Here, I hope to sow well every day.

JBN.S: – If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

PF: – I only wish that music (and art in general) had an even more important role in our society. In addition to social and political motivation, this would make us feel more important and useful in the society we are living.

JBN.S: – What’s the next musical frontier for you?

PF: – The musical frontiers are to keep on doing, to invent projects and to collaborate with new musicians trying also to keep alive the projects that already exist. This morning, as I answer the questions of this interview, I’m on a plane that takes me from Bologna to Amsterdam and it’s seven in the morning. I will play in Moulhouse with the singers of A Filetta and with Daniele di Bonaventura at the bandoneon. The new CD of the Devil group is about to be released in February, this time in a completely acoustic version and before the end of the year, the so-called “Danse, mèmoire danse” will come out with A Filetta. All this for my record label Tǔk Music with which, in addition to my recent works, they produce many young Italian musicians. I am also working on a project on the Laudi duecentesques of the “Laudario di Cortona” and a special version of the “Norma” by Bellini arranged by Paolo Silvestri. Also in November, will start a long theatrical tour that sees me protagonist in a project focused on the figure of Chet Baker. This is a totally new experience for me. I also follow the artistic directions of my Time in Jazz festival (which in 2017 has turned thirty) and of other events including the great project for the earthquake zones of central Italy and the brand new “JazzAlguer” festival in Sardinia.

JBN.S: – Are there any similarities between jazz and world music, including folk music?

PF: – Jazz is born as folk music and more and more, in my opinion, goes in this direction. One should understand the meaning of “word music” and “folk music”. Both can have a negative meaning. It is perhaps that the word jazz no longer makes sense today because it is too short to contain a century of music.

JBN.S: – Who do you find yourself listening to these days?

PF: – In Sardinia I listened to an old Jan Garbarek CD for ECM. In Paris an old work by Marisa Monte and some sonatas by Bach interpreted masterfully by Murray Perahia. Finally, in Bologna, I had to necessarily re-listen again the master of “Altissima luce”, our work taken from the Laudario di Cortona. You have to make some changes in the mix and therefore you have to listen to it several times carefully to take notes to be communicated to the sound engineer.

JBN.S: – What’s your current setup?

PF: – If by “setup” we mean the technical configuration I’m using: Bach Trumpet mod 7 “New York”. Horn “Oiram” flange by Hub Van Lar “Fresu” model. Bach 3c mouthpieces (troma and flugelhorn). Electronics: TC Electronic M 2000, TC Electronic G Force, Ramsa clip microphone.

JBN.S: – Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really wanna go?

PF: – Perhaps in the Venetian baroque of the 1600s. Along with Claudio Monteverdi and Barbara Strozzi some of whom occasionally sound something. There are similarities between the world of baroque and jazz … and at that time there was a lot of melody and harmony about to evolve …

JBN.S: – So far, I ask, please your question to me …

PF: – Everything good?

JBN.S: – Good !!! Thanks very much for answers …

Interview by Simon Sargsyan

Image result for паоло фресу джаз.ру

Аt the request of Italians readers will publish interviews in Italian.

Su richiesta dei lettori italiani pubblicheremo interviste in italiano.

Intervista jazz con il trombettista e flugelhornista jazz Paolo Fresu. Un’intervista via email per iscritto.

JBN.S: – First let’s start with where you grew up, and what got you interested in music?

PF: – Ho amato la musica fin da piccolissimo e strimpellavo l’armonica a bocca e poi la chitarra. Nel mio paese natale (Berchidda nel Nord della Sardegna) c’era (e c’è tuttora) una antica Banda Musicale che vedevo passare per strada. Il mio sogno era di farne parte fino a quando, a dieci anni, non mi sono iscritto alla Scuola della Banda per apprendere lo strumento e la lettura della musica.

JBN.S: – What got you interested in picking up the your musical instrument? What teacher or teachers helped you progress to the level of playing you have today? What made you choose the your musical instrument?

PF: – La tromba la avevo in casa perchè mio fratello, prima di me, si era ugualmente iscritto al corso della Banda ma poi aveva lasciato. Diciamo che è stato lo strumento a scegliere me! Subito dopo ho iniziato a suonare con I gruppi da ballo per allietare I matrimoni e poi nei complessi per le feste patronali e per le serate danzanti fino a quando non ho scoperto il jazz alla fine degli anni settanta e me ne sono inamorato. Il mio primo Maestro dunque è stato quello della Banda, Tiu Bustianu Piga. Il jazz invece lo ho studiato da autodidatta anche se sono andato per due anni a Siena Jazz a prendere delle lezioni prima con il sassofonista Claudio Fasoli e poi con Enrico Rava. Mi sono anche diplomato al Conservatorio di Cagliari ma non ho mai intrapreso la carriera classica.

JBN.S: – How did your sound evolve over time? What did you do to find and develop your sound?

PF: – Non avevo un bel suono. Ho sviluppato il suono al Conservatorio ma, nel contempo, ho passato molto tempo a sentire I miei trombettisti preferiti che erano Miles Davis e Chet Baker anche se sentivo anche gli altri del Bop e anche Booker Little. Didiamo che ho passato molto tempo ad ascoltare la versione di Davis di ‘Round Midnight dall’omonimo disco della Columbia del ’56. Amavo moltissimo il suo suono di sordina…

JBN.S: – What practice routine or exercise have you developed to maintain and improve your current musical ability especially pertaining to rhythm?

PF: – Dipende dal tempo a disposizione. Se sono in viaggio non riesco a studiare e lo faccio dunque a casa. Non lavoro però su patterns o cose relative al tempo ma piuttosto sulla tecnica dello strumento. Molte delle alter cose credo si possano studiare senza lo strumento perchè parto dall’idea che si debba suonare ciò che si pensa. Solo se non riesco a cantare (o a fischiare) qualcosa sento il bisogno di praticarla con lo strumento… Inoltre c’è bisogno di tempo per scrivere musica, arrangiare, pensare…

JBN.S: – Which harmonies and harmonic patterns do you prefer now?

PF: – Possibilmente cerco di evitare I patterns anche se sono necessari per partire e per apprendere. E cerco anche di non pensare alle armonie ma di lavorare sulla orizzontalità e dunque sulla melodia. Mi piace molto la melodia e lo sviluppo diatonico della musica e sempre di più cerco di scavare in questa direzione. Non memorizzo quindi la struttura degli accordi ma cerco di memorizzarne io suono e la sequenza. Dovessi scrivere anche l’armonia di un  mio brano dovrei andare a cercarla…. Per questo mi sforzo sempre di apprendere tutto a memoria e di fare a meno della partitura per sentirmi più libero.

JBN.S: – What do you love most about your new album 2017: <50 – fifty years played>, how it was formed and what you are working on today. This year your fans like we can wait for a new album?

PF: – “50 anni suonati” è in realtà una antologia con 50 brani live scelti tra I 50 concerti dati nel 2011. Ad esso si aggancia un dvd fatto dalla giovane regista francese Marthe le More che ne è il racconto. Nel 2017 ho invece pubblicato l’altro live in duo con Uri Caine dal titolo “Two Minuettos” e anche questo è il sunto di una ‘carta bianca’ di tre concerti (con tre temi diversi) fatti al Teatro dell’Elfo di Milano tre anni fa. Uscirà invece ai primi del 2018 “Carpe Diem”, la versione acustica del gruppo elettrico Devil Quartet.

JBN.S: – Which are the best jazz albums for you this 2017 year?

PF: – Non ne ho idea. Ci sono troppe cose belle che ho sentito e la musica non è una gara dove si deve arrivare primi. Potrei tirare a caso e fare così bella figura rispondendo alla sua domanda oppure scegliere il disco di un amico o della mia etichetta discografica ma non sarebbe onesto da parte mia.

JBN.S: – Please any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us?

PF: – La prima registrazione discografica in un vero studio e la paura folle di poter sentire il mio vero suono dall’altra parte del vetro… IUl tour dei “50’ anni suonati” che ho fatto in sardegna nel 2011 per festeggiare il mio cinquantesimo comopleanno con 50 concerti in 50 giorni consecutive con 50 progetti diversi tutti in luoghi all’aperto bellissimi e originali… Un concerto in un ospedale per bambini e uno in carcere… Uno su un albero e un’altro su un aereo… Diciamo che ogni giorno c’è una cosa da ricordare e se si suona professionalmente da quasi trentacinque anni con quasi duecento concerti all’anno le cose da ricordare sono molte. Anche quelle poco poacevoli che dunque provo a dimenticare…

JBN.S: – Many aspiring musicians are always looking for advice when navigating thru the music business. Is there any piece of advice you can offer to aspiring students or even your peers that you believe will help them succeed and stay positive in this business?

PF: – Il business è importante perchè la musica è la nostra vita e di questa dobbiamo vivere. Prima però c’è la passione che muove tutto e dunque, prima di pensare al business, bisogna pensare a crescere e fare bene le cose. C’è un tempo per ogni cosa anche se bisogna essere coscienti della necessità di tutelare I nostri diritti e di conoscere anche I nostri doveri. Credo che la verità stia nell’equilibrio tra il produrre buona musica e il cercare di venderla nel modo migliore. Inoltre bisogna esser molto coscienti, in un mondo ancora non collegato ed equitabile nonostante internet, del fatto che essere musicisti significa avere dei diritti professionali e anche legati all’industria discografica. Bisogna dunque essere informati ed esigere I propri diritti.

JBN.S: – Аnd furthermore, can jazz be a business today or someday?

PF: – Si. Perchè non dovrebbe essere?

JBN.S: – Which collaboration have been the most important experiences for you?

PF: – Ogni esperienza è ed è stata importante. Di certo la primissima con il contrabbassita e arrangiatore Bruno Tommaso che mi ha dato fiducia. Dopo questa la creazione del primo gruppo a mio nome con I musicisti del mio Quintetto storico e poi tutti gli altri. Dai miei gruppi fino alle piccolo formazioni da camera e ai duo. Potrei fare dei nomi ma, anche stavolta, sarebbe ingiusto nei confronti dei non citati e le collaborazioni importanti, non solo nel campo del jazz ma della musica in genere e dei linguaggi artistici, sono tante.

JBN.S: – How can we get young people interested in jazz when most of the standard tunes are half a century old?

PF: – Il jazz oggi non solo solo gli standar ma questi, per essere dei buoni jazzisti, bisogna comunque conoscerli. Essere ‘jazz’ ora significa poter toccare qualsiasi materiale e farlo proprio. Il problema del poco interesse dei giovani con credo sia nel material e nel repertorio ma piuttosto nel modo in cui questo viene proposto. Sono importanti le modalità quanto i luoghi. Di fatto molti non hanno idea di cosa sia il jazz e forse non lo hanno mai sentito. Se questo accade è colpa nostra. Del poco coraggio e della poca inventiva di alcuni programmatori oltre che di un certo disagio dovuto ai luoghi dove si consuma la musica che dovrebbe essere a portata di tutto e che dovrebbe mettere chi la ascolta, indipendentemente dall’età, a proprio agio. C’è poi il problema della discografia e della musica digitale che sta cambiando il concetto fruitivo della musica ma è un argomento troppo complesso per poter essere affrontato in questa sede.

JBN.S: – John Coltrane said that music was his spirit. How do you understand the spirit and the meaning of life?

PF: – Non solo la musica è il nostro ‘spirito’ ma è anche il nostro ‘mistico’. Se riusciamo a fare della musica il centro delle nostre scoperte e delle nostre aspirazioni questa sarà messa in un luogo alto. Per quanto la musica non sia tutto è parte della nostra vita e solo quando non c’è ci rendiamo conto di quanto sia importante per noi e per la società che viviamo. Musica è poesia, emozione, misticismo, mistero, comunicazione. L’elenco è talmente lungo che ognuno può aggiungere quello che vuole ma , soprattutto, la musica siamo noi e cresce e si sviluppa con noi e grazie a noi. Tutto questo non è straordinario?

JBN.S: – What are your expectations of the future? What brings you fear or anxiety?

PF: – Nessuna ansia sul futuro. Primo perchè non sono una persona ansiosa e poi perché il futuro – intendo quello apparentemente prevedibile – dipende da noi e da come lo impostiamo. Il resto è di difficile conoscenza ma, se abbiamo lavorato bene, il futuro sarà buono se non tormentato dalla malattia e dalle cause nefaste. Un detto italiano dice che “chi semina vento raccoglie tempesta”. Ciò presuppone che chi semina bene ha un raccolto ricco. Ecco, io spero di seminare bene ogni giorno.

JBN.S: – If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be?

PF: – Vorrei solamente che la musica (e l’arte in genere) avesse un ruolo ancora più importante nella nostra società. Oltre alla motivazione sociale e politica questo ci farebbe sentire più importanti e utili nella società che stiamo vivendo.

JBN.S: – What’s the next musical frontier for you?

PF: – Le frontiere musicali sono contibnuare a fare, a inventare progetti e a collaborare con nuovi musicisti cercando anche di mantenere in vita I progetti che già esistono. Stamane, mentre rispondo alle domande di questa intervista, sono su un aereo che da Bologna mi porta ad Amsterdan e sono le sette del mattino. Suonerò a Moulhouse con I cantanti corsi di A Filetta e con Daniele di Bonaventura al bandoneon. Sta per uscire a febbraio il nuovo cd del gruppo Devil stavolta in versione completamente acustica e prima della fine dell’anno uscirà, per appunto, il cd “Danse, mèmoire danse” con A Filetta. Tutto questo per la mia etichetta discografica Tǔk Music con la quale, oltre ai miei lavori recenti, producono tanti giovani musicisti italiani. Sto inoltre lavorando a un progetto sulle Laudi duecentesche del “Laudario di Cortona” e a una versione special della “Norma” di Bellini arrangiata da Paolo Silvestri. Inoltre a novembre prossimo partirà una lunga tournèe teatrale che mi vede protagonista in seno a un progetto incentrato sulla figura di Chet Baker (seppure liberamente ispirato). Questa è per me una esperienza totalmente nuova. Inoltre seguo le direzioni artistiche del mio festival Time in Jazz (che nel 2017 ha compiuto trent’anni) e di alter manifestazioni tra cui il grande progetto per le zone terremotate del centro Italia e la rassegna JazzAlguer in Sardegna.

JBN.S: – Are there any similarities between jazz and world music, including folk music?

PF: – Il jazz nasce come musica popolare e sempre di più, a mio avviso, va in questa direzione. Bisognerebbe intendersi sul senso di “word music” e di “folk music”. Tutte e due possono avere una accezione negativa. E’ che forse la parola jazz non ha più senso oggi in quanto è troppo breve per contenere un secolo di musica.

JBN.S: – Who do you find yourself listening to these days?

PF: – In Sardegna ho ascoltato un vecchio cd di Jan Garbarek per la ECM. A Parigi un vecchio lavoro di Marina Montes e alcune sonate di Bach interpretate magistramente da Murray Perahia. A Bologna ho dovuto necessariamente risentire il master di “Altissima luce”, il nostro lavoro tratto dal Laudario di Cortona. Bisogna fare alcune modifiche nel mix e dunque bisogna ascoltarlo più volte con attenzione per prendere appunti da comunicare al tecnico del suono.

JBN.S: – What’s your current setup?

PF: – Se per setup si intende la configurazione tecnica sto usando: Tromba Bach mod 7 “New York”. Flicorno “Oiram” di Hub Van Lar modello “Fresu”. Bocchini Bach 3c (troma e flicorno). Elettronica: TC Electronic M 2000, TC Electronic G Force, microfono clip Ramsa.

JBN.S: – Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really wanna go?

PF: – Forse nel barocco veneziano del 1600. A fianco di Claudio Monteverdi e Barbara Strozzi dei quali ogni tanto suono qualcosa. Ci sono similarità tra il mondo del barocco e il jazz… e in quell tempo c’era molta melodia e una armonia in procinto di evolversi…

JBN.S: – So far, I ask, please your question to me …

PF: – Tutto bene?

JBN.S: – Bene !!! Grazie mille per le risposte …

Intervista di Simon Sargsyan

Image result for paolo Fresu

Spread the love

Facebook Comments